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Tuesday, November 11, 2014

Momentum




There is a driving force, a passion that moves artists to create.  This can be said of all artists but there are two that come to mind when I contemplate this; McArthur Binion and of course, Darryll Schiff.  McArthur was an art educator of mine in addition to being an internationally renowned painter.  McArthur's is well established in his 60s, his work appears in noteworthy institutions such as the Contemporary Arts Museum Huston, Studio Museum NYC, Detroit Institute of Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art and Kavi Gupta Gallery, Chicago.

©McArthur Binion Detail on Birth of Colored: Four 2013
 
©McArthur Binion, Birth of Colored: Four 2013 at Kavi Gupta Gallery


McArthur's process stands out above other artists as his unique portrait requires painstaking work using photo-copied documents that include his birth certificate and address book from the 1970s.  This distinctly unique type of self portrait is achieved using shredded documents as collage materials that are  arranged in crosshatched tiles and placed in a grid on wooden panel.  The style this creates is expressively textured.  To compose this work McArthur goes beyond process art, and transitions into  labor.  The marks on these pieces incorporate crayon on panel and laser print collage.  When working with crayon, he presses the material down until it is completely used up. He applies this technique with each of his materials which  include crayon, oil stick, and ink on wood. 


©McArthur Binion, Studio 2014

  If you were to meet McArthur, you would see first hand the clear momentum he has as an artist. It was his work ethic and drive that made an impression on me as a student. Not only was his work physical to the point where it resembles manual labor, but Binion himself would explicitly encourage students to put art before all other aspects of life.  On numerous accounts he has told me, “Artists cannot have a job, a personal life and their art. They can only have two of the three, so if you need to support yourself at another job you cannot have a social life.”  He would further illustrate this with comments on his own life, “Art comes before your relationships, if you want to be a successful artists let your relationships suffer before your work.”  Binion also instructs artists to put art-making before art theory, written statements and self promotion tactics.  He firmly believes an outstanding body of work speaks for itself, and if you aren't good with words others will write them for you.  


©McArthur Binion DNA Study at Kavi Gupta Gallery 2014


  McArthur's personal history strongly influences the work he creates.  Binion's childhood goes beyond a rural upbringing. As a young boy he picked cotton in Mississippi before moving to Detroit.  McArthur describes himself now as a “Rural Modernist.”  His life journey is reflected in his art work, it has a lot to do with Mississippi and the move his family took to work in the automobile industry.   In one series of work he depicts things that grow in the ground that can be eaten, this includes “Digging Peanuts.”  His influences range from his personal experience to modernist painters he first came to know in his early 20s.  Influences include Mondrian and Wifredo Lam among others.  The way Binion creates art is less like painting and almost has more to do with performance, similar to the way people regard Jackson Pollock as a painter.  He is also inspired by West African Textiles, which comes out in his quilt-like modernist grids.  

©Darryll Schiff All Rights Reserved

  Darryll Schiff has an entirely different process with his photographic body of work, but the drive to always develop new projects is evident in his everyday life.  Fine art photography is a passionate obsession, always on the back of Darryll's mind even outside of his studio. He keeps on hand with him a number of smaller cameras to photograph apt. moments in life as sketches for larger projects while he develops ideas to communicate about life, society and the world around him. Darryll is a great thinker who finds inspiration consistently throughout various aspects in life.  
©Darryll Schiff All Rights Reserved


Darryll's  photos are not typically staged, the subjects are often everyday people carrying about their lives.  What Darryll has an eye for is the right locations, lighting and behavior in those surrounding him.  He photographs several bodies of work at once and is careful to edit each series in a way that further expresses his ideas. Darryll has an instinct to focus equally on both his subject and the technical execution of his photographs. He has a system when photographing and editing that achieves his desired effects.  The work comes first from an emotional place and then extends into a concept that is carried out masterfully in composition and style. 



©McArthur Binion, Birth of Colored: One 2013 at Kavi Gupta Gallery
©Darryll Schiff All Rights Reserved
  It is the work ethic and originality that elevates both Darryll and McArthur as artists.  The devotion of these artists goes beyond scheduled hours of studio work, it is the force within them as creators that is both gravitating and gratifying when pushing them in all other aspects of life.  Their art is a labor that defines them, who they are, what they see, all they know.  It is inspiring, it gives them power that each observer can feel.  The power of art. 

 - Lauren Ike




Thursday, October 23, 2014

Introducing Lauren to the DSFA Team




            Hello, I’m Lauren, Darryll’s new assistant at Darryll Schiff Fine Art.  I have been working with Darryll as part of the DSFA team since August of this year.  I am a fine art and fiber artist in addition to being a recent graduate of Columbia College Chicago with a bachelors in fine art and a minor in art history, soon to be going for my masters. 

©Darryll Schiff All Rights Reserved

            I was drawn to the position as Darryll’s assistant from the moment I came across his listing on Columbia’s job board.  I clicked on the link to this very website and came across Darryll’s portfolio of work.  Quickly I became captivated by his art.  His style was unlike any fine artist I’d seen before.  The colors and quality of his ephemeral photography left me with a deeper interest and desire to know more about the driving force behind his work.  It wasn’t until later that I read his bio and found out his artistic intent to capture the impermanent yet constant flow of contemporary times. 
©Darryll Schiff All Rights Reserved

There is a soft sadness and yet beauty that comes with being an individual of the human race (especially during this millennium of social media and technology).  In Darryll’s work I see this.  We are all part something bigger and united, yet we don’t always communicate this, which is very much a part of the human condition.  We are a passionate and vivid species and yet we are also an autopilot species, one and the same. Darryll captures individuals in complex moments of thought, enjoyment and reflection as well as completely absent minded, walking briskly through the rat-race portion of their busy days.
©Darryll Schiff All Rights Reserved
 
We are each uniquely alone, even when gathered together.  It’s not a tragic truth, in fact we are all united by it and can relate.  Through Darryll’s poetic photography, viewers can contemplate life’s little mysteries, as the visual experience almost heightens all other sense until the viewer is convinced they can hear, see and smell the scenery and become lost in it.  The sheer size of Darryll’s large works makes this extensively possible.  
©Darryll Schiff All Rights Reserved

At DSFA Studio, I often find myself contemplating a single word to convey the images that are so overwhelmingly vibrant.  Motion, though important to the aesthetic vocabulary of Darryll’s work is not where I landed.  Rather, I came up with “Essence”, the very title of one of Darryll's prominent series of work.  I deemed essence appropriate because it is the intrinsic nature or indispensible quality of all Darryll’s subjects that I respond to in his art.  He has a true talent and a distinctly beautiful vision when capturing the essence of his subjects, whether it’s human, place, nature or thing.  
©Darryll Schiff All Rights Reserved


As a fine artist I find working with Darryll inspiring.  Being his assistant is refreshing.  Working beside Darryll as he creates new bodies of work keeps me motivated to continue with my own art practice where I seemingly “paint” with material. 
©Lauren Ike All Rights Reserved

My process is very different than Darryll’s but holds it’s own calm, meditative effects in the repetitive series of highly physical steps when slashing, tearing, knotting and stabbing in order to create. There is a physical cycle of death and rebirth brought on by my hands, the work is activated by violent acts that have a calming effect as repetition breeds peaceful frustrations.  





©Lauren Ike All Rights Reserved

Above are samples of my work and a link to my site laurenike.com if you care to see more, or you may also like my artist page on facebook where I update my latest works in progress facebook.com/artistlaurenike

I have over 230 fabric pieces that are roughly 5"x5", I did a variable piece that covered a 14'x8' wall with this series of work. The installation is shown below at Chicago's A+D gallery.  Come see this body of work installed at Beverly Arts Center's 38th Annual Arts Competition showing November 7, 2014 - January 4, 2015.

©Lauren Ike All Rights Reserved

©Lauren Ike All Rights Reserved


Darryll’s work is clearly very different from my own but ultimately it relates in the feelings both bodies of work provoke.  I’m of course referring to the energy that is
felt in each vivacious piece.  Each component gives its own impression, frozen only to a point as change hangs in the air. There is always action, reflection and growh that comes with life.  

©Darryll Schiff All Rights Reserved

 I hope you enjoyed my introductory post.  I have high hopes for my future contributions at DSFA. Until next time! - Lauren

Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Confluences



©Darryll Schiff


As an Otium featured artist, I was asked to take part in the Otium Collective exhibition, Confluences held this past September.  This was an exciting showcase full of talented Chicago artists.  Otium, as you may not realize, is a Latin word meaning to withdraw from one’s daily business and affairs to engage in activities considered to be artistically valuable or enlightening.  Given the definition, the Otium Collective was appropriately named as it offers artistic enlightenment through its community of artists and the work we have to offer. 

©Darryll Schiff


            The exhibition was a colorful curation that featured the artwork of notable artists such as Flow, Rita J, Joseph “Sentrock” Perez, Erin Burke, Tara Zanzig, Brett Whitcare and myself – all of which are artists who have a prominent presence in Chicago’s Art scene.  The show consisted of a variety of styles showcased through different mediums, all of which portrayed the unique perspective of the artist.  The works of two photographers (myself being one), multiple pop-art and stencil artists and the artistic renderings of personified creatures filled the gallery space with color and vitality.  Performance artists and live painters conveyed their slice of life as each artist depicted a colorful truth about themselves and the world we live in.    

©Darryll Schiff

            As it so happened, my contribution to the show was a piece from my Descending to Heaven series, which became the centerpiece of the entire show.  Hauntingly gravitating, my piece hung alone on the back of the gallery’s white wall and beckoned viewers to experience it up close, from the moment they could first see it when entering the exhibition.   On opening night I watched as my sole piece captivate the interest of many, curious if they knew I was the artist behind this alluring piece. 

©Darryll Schiff


            It excited me to see how our group of collected artists drew a crowd of art enthusiasts to experience our work, together for the first time all in one place.  What I reflected on that evening was my place as a prominent member of an ever growing, and ever changing art community full of inspiring individuals.

©Darryll Schiff


Of course, I cannot mention the show without giving credit to the talented curator who made it all possible, Ophélie le Troadec.  The intended goal of the Otium Collective is to create a network by artists, for artists and judging by that criteria, our group exhibition was a huge success! Each unique voice that was brought together for the Confluences exhibition played an active part in painting an abstract picture of what it means to be an artist in the city of Chicago.  I hope that in reading this blog post, and viewing some photos from the event, you too will have a better understanding of our artistic intent and need to share in the beauty we dare to express.

©Darryll Schiff

Congratulations to all of the artists on an excellent group exhibition!  We had a wonderful show and I want to thank all of the Chicagoans who came out to see it! For more information on the artists involved see the Featured Artists link on the Otium page http://otiumcollective.com/

©Darryll Schiff

Please stay tuned for a look at my all new series, I will be revealing images soon! - Darryll 




Tuesday, September 9, 2014


DSFA UPDATE - Something Old, Lots New

©Darryll Schiff  All Rights Reserved


We've been busy, as usual, here at Darryll Schiff Fine Art.  Earlier this year
I finished my Descending to Heaven series.  As many of you know, it was
a huge, very successful project that took 18 months to complete.

As a whole, the series really connected me to a different way of thinking and 
working on my art (you can view some of these pieces at www.schiff-art.com).
While Spain is still on my mind, its time to start covering other things.


©Darryll Schiff  All Rights Reserved


For this blog post, I am sharing with you four pictures, from romantic
to dramatic, that I have taken over the years, each depicting nature,

which I stray from, but always come back to from time to time.

Looking at them it is easy to spot the differences in the artworks,
however, it is equally true that all four have evident components that
represent distinct steps and definite progress in my artwork.  It
should not be too difficult to pick out the oldest and the newest 
of the photographs.


©Darryll Schiff  All Rights Reserved

Ideally, I like to work on 2-3 series at a time.  I find that when I have 
more than one thing going, I tend to oscillate between them.  I work very
intensely on each photo in the series and it benefits me to take breaks on one 
by going to the the next project.  This way I maintain a proper perspective
on what I am saying and how that transposes itself into my art.  That final
piece of art must be as interesting as all the intellectual, emotional,
and subconscious thought that goes into it.

©Darryll Schiff  All Rights Reserved


Soon, in a future post, we'll start showing a couple of teasers from the 
most recent projects. Stay tuned.
              
                 - Darryll

Monday, August 4, 2014

Spain- "Sketches of Spain"- Part 4


© Darryll Schiff

After "singing" the praises of Spain and how enchanted I am with the people and the country, I thought it would be time to more directly relate this last trip to my art and photography.  I have talked about the museums, galleries, and the wonderful Eloisa at Art Gallery Tour but now I want to talk a bit about my own art and what comes into play when I travel and shoot.

© Darryll Schiff

It used to be that any time I knew I would be somewhere making pictures, I would pack my latest heavy duty professional Nikon and lenses. I have been shooting exclusively digitally now for over eight years which means I don't have to deal with carrying around rolls and rolls of film, trips back and forth to the lab, worrying  about airport x-ray machines, etc. I don't miss it at all.

© Darryll Schiff

© Darryll Schiff
Now, besides my latest digital Nikon, a D800, I also extensively use one of my older Nikon P6000's, sort of a pro/am point and shoot, and.......my iPhone, of course. The pictures in this blog come from a mix of these cameras, and even my Nikon D300, and older camera that I still use. All the pictures were taken in Spain and are a mix of serious and fun shots - you have to keep the fun and excitement in it.

 

© Darryll Schiff

 

 © Darryll Schiff
© Darryll Schiff
I used my iPhone a lot more than expected, mainly for the touristy snapshots, but if you take time to really compose and time your shots right, the results can be amazing. Also, it's a great little device to do quick "sketch" shots, the way a painter might take a pencil to paper to map out their final image. The following is a shot from my iPhone that I treated as a type of "sketch":
© Darryll Schiff

The funny thing about my P6000s is how the way I use them has evolved.  Originally, when I 
bought my first one, it was going to be my "sketch pad", something I could have with me all the
time, to capture ideas, play around with, and get the occasional serious picture with. As I used the
camera more and more, I found ways to take advantage of a couple of its features that fit right into what I see (examples below). I now have four of them!

© Darryll Schiff


© Darryll Schiff
© Darryll Schiff

Although I print my work in all sizes, most of it is big--40x60, 58x88, even as large as 75x177. The D800 (Nikon's newest version is the D810) is the camera I use for those huge pieces. As I work on my pictures from this trip, I get really excited. I'm sure those big images will be hanging in my studio very soon.
-Darryll